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 Title   Date   Author   Host 

The Huffington Post

by Kelly Preston

June 2, 2005

I am deeply concerned over the escalating number of children who have been placed on mind-altering psychiatric drugs over the last decade after being labeled ADD and ADHD.

All too often, parents are told that their child has a mental disorder and that this is a medical condition requiring that they be put on drugs. This is fraudulent. There are no blood tests, brain scans or “chemical imbalance” tests that can prove that any of these so called mental disorders are a disease, illness or medical condition. No such tests exist. These “tests” are simply a checklist of behaviors -- subjective questionnaires -- to determine if these children have so-called mental illnesses.

World Privacy Forum

May 26, 2005

Consumer tips for retrieving your federally mandated free credit report. Before you call, click, or mail for your federally mandated free credit report, read these tips to help you avoid potential problems and pitfalls.

Online tip: Do not use a library or public computer to access your free credit report. Shared computers may inadvertently help share your credit report information with others. Only access your report online via your own computer, or a trusted computer.

Online tip: Giving An Email Address is Voluntary - Know that you are not required to give out your email address in order to obtain a federally mandated free credit report.

USA Today

May 25, 2005

At least half of U.S. medical schools are willing to give companies that sponsor studies of drugs and treatments considerable control over the results, says a survey that some doctors found troubling.

Half of the schools said they would let pharmaceutical companies and makers of medical devices draft articles that appear in medical journals, and a quarter would allow them to supply the actual results. But academics draw the line at gag orders that keep researchers from publishing negative findings. Private industry pays for more than two-thirds of medical research at U.S. universities, which has led increasingly to conflict-of-interest suspicions. Two decades ago, the federal government was the main benefactor.

Washington Post (Finland)

by Robert G. Kaiser

May 24, 2005

A foreigner asking to visit a school in Finland this spring got an unexpected reply from the Helsinki City Education Department: Our schools are overwhelmed by visitors; do you have to visit just now?

In fact, the Finns, who have long felt neglected by the rest of the world, are delighted to show off their schools. But they do have a logistical problem. Foreign educators in droves want to visit Finnish schools for the simple reason that they are so good -- very likely the best on Earth.

The Christian Science Monitor

by Kim Campbell

May 24, 2005

A few years back, Chelsea Rippy was a frustrated shopper. She would go out once a week looking for new clothes and would come back empty-handed.

Racks of cleavage-baring tops and low-rise jeans were leaving the stylish young mom with few options for clothes she felt comfortable in. Ms. Rippy, a Mormon, finally decided to fix the problem herself. Last fall she launched her own line of stretchy T-shirts and camisoles that can be worn under today's most revealing clothes. She's been surprised by the reception her shirts have received - and by the diversity of customers who buy from her online and at home parties.

Globe Technology (Canada)

by Jack Kapica

May 18, 2005

Ask Internet safety advocates about the need to protect children from the Internet, and they will tell you the trick is to put the computer in the living room, where surfing can become a family activity.

Yet almost half of respondents to an AOL Canada survey say they would put an Internet-connected computer into the privacy of their children's bedroom. At the other extreme, almost 30 per cent of parents also said they don't intend to allow their children to go on-line at home at all.


May 18, 2005

A federal judge whose family was murdered is urging the Senate to condemn harsh remarks about the judiciary.

U-S District Judge Joan Humphrey Lefkow (LEF'-koh) told the Senate Judiciary Committee the safety of judges around the country is at stake. She says, "Fostering disrespect for judges can only encourage those who are on the edge, or the fringe, to exact revenge on a judge who ruled against them."

Medical News Today (UK)

May 18, 2005

Children of imprisoned mothers generally have insecure relationships with their mothers and caregivers, according to a new study published in the May/June issue of the journal Child Development.

The study, conducted by researchers from the University of Wisconsin, assessed how children thought and felt about their close relationships and family experiences in 54 children ranging from 2 ½ to 7 ½ years old whose mothers were imprisoned. Most of the children lived with their grandparents.

The Sierra Times

by Nancy Levant

May 16, 2005

In the 2005-2006 school year, all parents will receive written notice of new policies from your children's schools. Many schools will ask you to sign permission slips, allowing school counselors to have conversations with your children.

You will be told how your local schools are now involved in vision and dental screenings, learning disabilities and speech impediment screenings, and other acts of kindness, but watch for the small print or the extra little blurb, which states that your children will also be evaluated for emotional wellness. Watch for wording like “happiness indicators” or “family participation.”

Seattle Post-Intelligencer (WA)

by Jessica Blanchard

May 16, 2005

Every year, school districts around the state go to great lengths to protect the sanctity of the Washington Assessment of Student Learning.

The standardized tests are kept under lock and key. Schools must account for every test booklet, lest some student make off with a copy to pass on to future classes. There are even rules limiting students' bathroom breaks.

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