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 Title   Date   Author   Host 

Find Law's Legal Commentary

by Noah S. Leavitt

May 9, 2005

Late last week, the U.S. House quickly approved an $82 billion appropriations bill to fund America's military involvement in Iraq and Afghanistan. This bill is headed to the Senate in the next few days.

Tucked inside this massive funding package are some of the most sweeping - and, many have said, harshest - changes to immigration law in years. Representative James Sensenbrenner (R - Wis), the Chair of the House Judiciary Committee, is the primary sponsor of this legislation, which is known as the "REAL ID" Act.

The most high-profile provision of REAL ID would mandate that applicants for state drivers' licenses must prove they are in the U.S. legally, in order to get identification that may be used at federal facilities (airports, national parks, government offices, and so on).

Information Week

by Fred Langa,

May 9, 2005

Before you embrace all of Google's new technologies, consider the privacy implications. Google's stuff is great, Fred Langa says, but don't get carried away with the novelty of it all.

It's not just the main Google search engine, of course, although that's its principal strength and is how most people know Google. Rather, it's also the new spin-offs and additional technologies. Some of these are fairly well-known, but others are just now making it to the consciousness of the online world at large: Gmail, Google Desktop Search, Google Groups 2, Google Deskbar, Web Alerts, Search by Location, Google Glossary, Google News Alerts, Froogle, and more. Google's services are immensely useful, and the company's reach is huge and growing. I believe this is mostly a good thing, but with several major caveats, as the questions raised in these reader letters suggest...

The KCRA Channel 3 (CA)

May 5, 2005

Members of law enforcement, Child Protective Services and the Sacramento County Probation Department conducted a truancy sweep Thursday. The goal was to get children back in school.

Officials visited the homes of parents whose children haven't been showing up for school. They called it a "knock and talk." Officers warned parents that if their child continued to be truant, arrest warrants could be issued. Authorities said they are trying to make a difference.

PR Leap (NY)

by Joel Turtel

May 2, 2005

Public schools are just another failed government program. Parents should not waste 12 precious years of their children's lives by allowing their kids to suffer through a third-rate, mind-numbing, public-school education.

For over fifty years, public-school officials and politicians have tried one education fad after another. They have all failed. Joel Turtel, author of "Public Schools, Public Menace: How Public Schools Lie To Parents and Betray Our Children" explains why public schools can waste 12 years of a child's life...

Times Herald-Record (NY)

May 2, 2005

Like the growing numbers passing through social services each month, Crowe is up against a wall that is a distinct structure of the poor. By losing her home, she's lost the privilege of choice.

Jolly said DSS does not place people but rather determines what rent amount they are entitled to. The agency will find them a home, he said. But people are free to search for an apartment on their own, as long as it does not cost more than the rent voucher. Crowe found an apartment in Middletown that was $114 per month more than the $735 that DSS allotted her.

Renew America

by Steve Kellmeyer

April 28, 2005

For most Americans, homeschooling seems rather odd. Why bother with it?

We have had public and private schools with us all of our lives, as have our parents before us and their parents before them from time immemorial. Why not stick with what works? The thought would be touching, if it were historically accurate. It isn't. The concept of compulsory schools with mass attendance is a radically new idea to Western civilization, no older than industrialization. Indeed, industrialization arguably could not have taken place without the mass school, and therein lies a tale.

MSNBC

by Michael Rogers

April 24, 2005

Will America's favorite technology really go dark next year? Depending on the outcome of discussions in Congress, television as we know it may end at exactly midnight Dec. 31, 2006.

That's the date Congress targeted, a decade ago, for the end of analog television broadcasting and a full cutover to a digital format. If enforced, that means that overnight, somewhere around 70 million television sets now connected to rabbit ears or roof-top antennas will suddenly and forever go blank, unless their owners purchase a special converter box. Back when the legislation was written, New Year's Eve 2006 probably looked as safely distant as the dark side of the moon.

Orange County Register (CA) [Free subscription required]

by Hanh Kim Quach

April 22, 2005

Reagan, Wilson got more from moneyed, and some lawmakers and activists want the rich to do more to ease the state's deficit.

With the state entering its fourth straight year of large projected deficits, one proposed solution has re-emerged: Tax the rich - more and more. The idea is not new. Former Republican governors Ronald Reagan and Pete Wilson did it in the 1960s and 1990s. Why can't we do it now, some Democrats ask. Their proposals:

MSNBC

April 21, 2005

Stage set for clash with Senate; Bush wants energy bill by summer

The House voted late Wednesday to allow oil drilling in an Alaska wildlife refuge. The bill's sponsors said oil from Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, as much as a million barrels a day, will be needed to help curtail the country's growing dependence on oil imports.

MSNBC

by Rueters

April 18, 2005

IRS security flaws put taxpayers at risk, study finds. The IRS promised to fix any problems and find out if tax returns had been exposed to outsiders.

Computer-security flaws at the U.S. tax-collection agency expose millions of taxpayers to potential identity theft or illegal police snooping, according to a congressional report released Monday.

      
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