Reliable Answers - News and Commentary

Education Research

An archive of research links and resources highlighting preschool, kindergarten and child research studies, conducted by educational and independent sources and how they relate to childhood development, family cohesiveness and educational values.

      
 Title   Date   Author   Host 

worldtruth.tv

September 19, 2012

Nanotechnology is measured in billionths of a meter, encompassing all aspects of life from food to medicine, clothing, to space. Imagine hundreds of microcomputers on the width of a strand of hair programmed for specific tasks....in your body. Sound good?

Engineering at a molecular level may be a future corporations' dream come true, however, nano-particles inside your body have few long-term studies especially when linked to health issues. Despite this new huge income-generating field there is a growing body of toxicological information suggesting that nanotechnology when consumed can cause brain damage (as shown in largemouth bass), and therefore should undergo a full safety assessment. It is possible for nano-particles to slip through the skin, suggestive of a potential unnatural interaction with the immune system, or when micro particles enter the blood-stream. Some sunscreens on the shelf today, for instance, have nano-particles that might be able to penetrate the skin, move between organs, with unknown health effects. Nano-particles in cosmetics have few regulations done by FDA. Regulators are proposing that food companies that want to use tiny engineered particles in their packaging may have to provide extra testing data to show the products are safe.

Personal Liberty Alerts

by Upi - United Press International, Inc.

September 17, 2012

NASA says researchers are struggling to identify and understand an image its long-lived rover Opportunity has returned of small spheres on the martian surface.

Spherical objects photographed at an outcrop Opportunity reached last week differ in several ways from iron-rich spherules - nicknamed "blueberries" - the rover found at its landing site in early 2004 and at many other locations since, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., reported Friday. Preliminary analysis suggests the spheres, as big as 1/8 inch in diameter, do not appear to have the high iron content of martian blueberries, researchers said.

Personal Liberty Alerts

by Upi - United Press International, Inc.

September 6, 2012

So-called "junk DNA," genetic material in our cells long considered without purpose, plays a vital role in regulating our genes, international researchers say.

A study of the 98 percent of the human genome that is not, strictly speaking, genes suggests more than three-quarters of entire allotment of DNA is active at some point in our lives, The Washington Post reported Wednesday. "This concept of 'junk DNA' is really not accurate," said Richard Myers, one of the leaders of the 400-scientist Encyclopedia of DNA Elements Project, nicknamed Encode. "It is an outdated metaphor to explain our genome."

CNS News

September 5, 2012

Federal investigators have found that a Harvard University psychology professor who resigned after being accused of scientific misconduct fabricated data and manipulated results in experiments.

The Boston Globe reports that the findings about Marc Hauser were contained in a report by the Department of Health and Human Services Office of Research Integrity released Wednesday. Hauser resigned last summer, ten months after a faculty investigation found him "solely responsible" for eight instances of scientific misconduct at the Ivy League school.

Michelle Malkin

by Doug Powers

August 25, 2012

We've lost a hero, pioneer, explorer, patriot and genuine inspiration for multiple generations who was nevertheless the essence of humility. It's just been reported that Neil Armstrong has died at 82.

Hot Air

by Ed Morrissey

August 24, 2012

I saw this yesterday for the first time, a couple of days after the Daily Mail wrote about it, but the TED video has been up almost a month, and has over 460,000 views.  It's long, but worth every moment of time. 

The wizards of MIT have developed a camera that takes video at one trillion frames per second, a huge leap that now allows researchers to see how light travels. The result is a spectacular and detailed video progression that shows how photons travel, break apart, get absorbed, and bounce repeatedly within an infinitesimal space of time.

CNS News

August 2, 2012

A jury has awarded Monsanto $1 billion in a patent-infringement trial against rival DuPont.

The jury determined that a subsidiary of The DuPont Co., based in Wilmington, Del., willfully violated St. Louis-based Monsanto Co.'s so-called Roundup Ready technology.

CNS News

by Jay Lindsay

July 27, 2012

Divers have discovered a World War II-era German submarine nearly 70 years after it sank under U.S. attack in deep waters off Nantucket.

The U-550 was found Monday by a seven-man group, some of whom have been searching for several years. It was the second trip in two years to the site by the team of divers, which was organized by New Jersey lawyer Joe Mazraani.

news.ucsc.edu

by Guy Lasnier

July 26, 2012

Apple's release this week of its Mac OSX "Mountain Lion" operating system is drawing attention to the real thing prowling the wooded hills just a few miles from the company's Cupertino headquarters.

Since 2008, UC Santa Cruz researchers have captured 36 mountain lions (Puma concolor) in the Santa Cruz mountains as part of the UCSC Puma Project to better understand the big cats' physiology, behavior, and ecology. They've outfitted the lithe, tawny-colored predators with high-tech electronic collars that show where the mountain lions are and where they have been. Fourteen still have active GPS collars, said UCSC environmental studies Ph.D. student Yiwei Wang. Two others are followed manually. Of the remaining 20 lions, some collars have failed, or the lions have disappeared or died.

care2.com

by Cathryn Wellner

July 20, 2012

As if there were not already enough concern about the impact of GMO crops on agriculture and the environment, a new international study raises the worry that a diet including genetically modified ingredients may be contributing to obesity.

The effect of GM foods on rats, mice, pig and salmon is being studied by an international team from Hungary, Austria, Ireland, Turkey, Australia and Norway. In March they reported preliminary findings that found no negative metabolic changes in the pigs, salmon or mice they tested. The results released in July link GM corn with modest weight gain in rats. The animals were fed corn with an insect-resistant gene. The control group ate unmodified corn. During the course of the 90-day study, the gm-fed rats gained more weight than the others.

      
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