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Education Research

An archive of research links and resources highlighting preschool, kindergarten and child research studies, conducted by educational and independent sources and how they relate to childhood development, family cohesiveness and educational values.

      
 Title   Date   Author   Host 

reuters.com

by Caroline Stauffer

July 28, 2014

Genetically modified corn seeds are no longer protecting Brazilian farmers from voracious tropical bugs, increasing costs as producers turn to pesticides, a farm group said on Monday.

Producers want four major manufacturers of so-called BT corn seeds to reimburse them for the cost of spraying up to three coats of pesticides this year, said Ricardo Tomczyk, president of Aprosoja farm lobby in Mato Grosso state. "The caterpillars should die if they eat the corn, but since they didn't die this year producers had to spend on average 120 reais ($54) per hectare ... at a time that corn prices are terrible," he said.

CNS News

by Cassandra Vinograd

December 2, 2011

Can you crack the code? That's the question Britain's electronic listening agency, GCHQ, is asking in an online campaign to find the next generation of cyber specialists.

GCHQ quietly launched a cryptic website last month featuring a box of code made up of numbers and letters. There is no branding on the site, only the phrase "Can you crack it?" and a box to type in an answer. The agency has now revealed it is behind the campaign, and said Friday it's trying to reach individuals with "a keen interest in code breaking and ethical hacking" for careers at GCHQ. "It's to arouse interest in people who perhaps might not be caught by our normal recruitment campaigns," a GCHQ spokesman said, speaking on customary condition of anonymity.

care2.com

by Cathryn Wellner

July 20, 2012

As if there were not already enough concern about the impact of GMO crops on agriculture and the environment, a new international study raises the worry that a diet including genetically modified ingredients may be contributing to obesity.

The effect of GM foods on rats, mice, pig and salmon is being studied by an international team from Hungary, Austria, Ireland, Turkey, Australia and Norway. In March they reported preliminary findings that found no negative metabolic changes in the pigs, salmon or mice they tested. The results released in July link GM corn with modest weight gain in rats. The animals were fed corn with an insect-resistant gene. The control group ate unmodified corn. During the course of the 90-day study, the gm-fed rats gained more weight than the others.

Social Science Research Network

by Charlene Kalenkoski, David Ribar, Leslie Stratton

February 1, 2006

Time Diary Evidence from the United States and the United Kingdom

This study uses time diary data from the 2003 American Time Use Survey and the United Kingdom Time Use Survey 2000 to examine the time that single, cohabiting, and married parents devote to caring for their children.

bloomberg.com

by Charles Murray

February 21, 2013

"Study after study shows that the earlier a child begins learning, the better he or she does down the road," said U.S. President Barack Obama in Feb. 14 speech in Decatur, Georgia.

Obama wants to help our nation's children flourish. So do I. So does everyone who is aware of the large number of children who are not flourishing. There are just two problems with his solution: The evidence used to support the positive long-term effects of early childhood education is tenuous, even for the most intensive interventions. And for the kind of intervention that can be implemented on a national scale, the evidence is zero.

News Medical

by Child Health News

October 16, 2006

According to researchers in the UK, how much a child's head grows by the time he or she reaches age one may be an indication of a child's intelligence.

The researchers from the University of Southampton, in England say although they do not know exactly what causes some babies to have bigger brains than others, the brain volume a child achieves by the age of one year helps determine later intelligence.

The Atlantic Monthly (MA)

by Christina Hoff Sommers

November 19, 2000

How Misguided Feminism Is Harming Our Young Men

A look at the sex breakdown of the CDC's suicide statistics reveals that for males aged ten to fourteen, the suicide rate increased 71 percent between 1979 and 1988; for girls the increase was 27 percent.

Reason Foundation [pdf]

by Christopher F. Cardiff and Edward Stringham

May 30, 2006

Almost two-thirds of California families currently choose to send their 4-year-olds to preschool.Of those who do, almost half choose a preschool program operated by the state of California, while the other half choose a privately operated preschool.

If Proposition 82, an initiative on the June ballot, is implemented those figures will radically change. Most family- and other privately owned preschools will vanish, replaced by government-run, taxpayer-funded preschools. This report assesses RAND Corporation's cost benefit analysis and finds that it significantly overestimates the upsides and drastically underestimates the downsides of universal preschool and the California proposal. Using RAND's own data and alternative assumptions based on the studies they reference, it is easy to demonstrate that universal preschool generates losses of 25 to 30 cents for every dollar spent.

scienceandpublicpolicy.org

by Christopher Monckton of Brenchley

October 18, 2007

A spokesman for Al Gore has issued a questionable response to the news that in October 2007 the High Court in London had identified nine "errors" in his movie An Inconvenient Truth.

The judge had stated that, if the UK Government had not agreed to send to every secondary school in England a corrected guidance note making clear the mainstream scientific position on these nine "errors", he would have made a finding that the Government's distribution of the film and the first draft of the guidance note earlier in 2007 to all English secondary schools had been an unlawful contravention of an Act of Parliament prohibiting the political indoctrination of children.

space.com

by Clara Moskowitz

September 19, 2012

Faster than light travel may actually be possible using a warp drive to bend space around a starship. New calculations suggest such a vehicle would require less energy than once thought.

A warp drive to achieve faster-than-light travel - a concept popularized in television's Star Trek - may not be as unrealistic as once thought, scientists say. A warp drive would manipulate space-time itself to move a starship, taking advantage of a loophole in the laws of physics that prevent anything from moving faster than light. A concept for a real-life warp drive was suggested in 1994 by Mexican physicist Miguel Alcubierre; however, subsequent calculations found that such a device would require prohibitive amounts of energy.

      
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