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Education Research

An archive of research links and resources highlighting preschool, kindergarten and child research studies, conducted by educational and independent sources and how they relate to childhood development, family cohesiveness and educational values.

      
 Title   Date   Author   Host 

KCRA Sacramento

by Greg Keller

September 1, 2009

PARIS -- America has some of the industrial world's worst rates of infant mortality, teenage pregnancy and child poverty, even though it spends more per child than countries such as Switzerland, Japan and the Netherlands, a new survey indicates.

The U.S. spends an average of $140,000 per child, well over the OECD average of $125,000. But this spending is skewed heavily toward older children between 12 and 17, the OECD survey showed. U.S. spending on children under six, a period the OECD says is key to children's future well-being, lags far behind other countries, amounting to only $20,000 per child on average.

Consent Of The Governed

by Judy Aron

June 2, 2009

The U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education, came out with their report on homeschooling. It's been all the talk on websites and blogs and Facebook.

The USAToday analysis is simplistic and ignores basic economic facts, while trying to create a sense that homeschoolers are somehow whiter and richer. They are misleading, and neglected to mention the more impressive growth in numbers of non-white children who homeschool.

InfoWorld

by Roger A. Grimes

March 28, 2009

The results of the CanSecWest 2009 PWN2OWN hacking contest are in. And guess what? The hackers won, and the browsers lost -- the lone exception being Google Chrome.

Hackers successfully compromised fully patched Firefox, Internet Explorer, and Safari browsers, all using exploits that required the local user to load a malicious Web site. Today, that's how 99.999 percent of exploits happen. Google's Chrome was the only browser the hackers did not break. Dr. Miller said that he had Chrome exploits but couldn't leverage the exploits into something useful.

eblogs.baltimoresun.com

by David Zeiler

March 28, 2009

Mac susceptibility to malware is not as black-and-white as many people believe. Apple haters celebrated Miller's feat; Safari was the first browser to fall in last week's contest. (Internet Explorer 8 and Firefox also were breached, but Google's Chrome wa

Meanwhile, the Mac community mostly jeered, noting Miller had prepared his exploit in the weeks before the contest. Although true, it doesn't change the fact he discovered a valid hole in Safari's code. Mac users should be less critical and more concerned. I know the notion of Mac vulnerability is unpopular, but Miller makes convincing arguments. And unlike vendors of anti-virus software, Miller and the company he works for...have nothing to gain.

Med Page Today

by Judith Groch

September 18, 2008

A child who is subject to harsh discipline or witnesses violence in the home is likely to have increased psychological and behavioral problems with further exposure to abuse, a study found.

The study found that previously abused children who subsequently witnessed home violence were more likely to have internalized symptoms, such as anxiety and depression. By contrast, previously abused children subjected to further harsh physical discipline externalized their symptoms, becoming more aggressive and prone to rule-breaking, the researchers reported.

TCPalm

by Kelly Tyko

August 11, 2008

Sara Garman doesn't have to worry about a school dress code or the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test. As one of the 2,000-plus students on the Treasure Coast who is home-schooled.

When the upcoming school year begins Aug. 18 for Treasure Coast public schools, there likely will be more home-schooled students than ever before and the number of home-schooled students is expected to continue to rise. For the 2007-08 school year, the Florida Department of Education estimated 56,650 students were home schooled, compared with 31,440 students in 1997-98 - an 80 percent increase.

WebMD

by Salynn Boyles

May 16, 2008

Young children who experience separation from a parent are at increased risk for learning problems as they enter kindergarten, new research shows.

While the emotional and behavioral impact of separation from a parent on young children is well recognized, the study is one of the first to examine the effect on learning as children begin school. Children in the study who had been separated from a parent scored significantly worse than children with intact families in testing designed to measure key early learning issues.

ASSIST News Service

by Jeremy Reynalds

April 26, 2008

Results from a recently released study show the vast majority of Americans have significant doubts about the quality of a public school education, and believe other options generally are better for children.

According to a news release from Ellison Research, the study asked Americans to rate the overall quality of education students get from public schools, home schooling, charter schools, and three types of private schools: non-religious, Catholic, and Christian (non-Catholic), and then to decide which option is the best for students in a number of different ways.

One News Now

by Allie Martin

April 24, 2008

A new survey on education reveals some surprising results when it comes to public versus private education.

On a five-point scale, the average rating a public school education received was 3.0. Next came home schooling with an average rating of 3.14, and then charter schools with an average rating of 3.41. Private Christian schools received an average rating of 3.69...

Baptist Press

by Kelly Boggs

March 7, 2008

A study titled "Strengths of Their Own: Home Schoolers Across America" found that, on average, homeschooled children scored 30 to 37 points higher than public school students. The study consisted of 5,402 homeschool students from 1,657 families.

Recent statistics indicate that public schools spend an average of $8,701 per student. If half of that money comes from the federal and state governments, then a school misses out on $4,305.50, per child, when a kid is taught at home. In the case of California's estimated 166,000 homeschooled population that comes to $7,221,000. That, my friends, is a significant chunk of government change.

      
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