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Education Research

An archive of research links and resources highlighting preschool, kindergarten and child research studies, conducted by educational and independent sources and how they relate to childhood development, family cohesiveness and educational values.

      
 Title   Date   Author   Host 

National Center for Education Statistics - Executive Summary

February 4, 2006

This report represents the latest survey information from the National Center for Education Statistics on the prevalence of homeschooling in the United States.

Interviews were conducted with the parents of 11,994 students ages 5 through 17 with a grade equivalent of kindergarten through 12th grade. Of these students, 239 were homeschooled. The NHES is designed to collect data on a wide range of educational indicators and types of students, including, but not limited to, homeschooling.

Social Science Research Network

by Charlene Kalenkoski, David Ribar, Leslie Stratton

February 1, 2006

Time Diary Evidence from the United States and the United Kingdom

This study uses time diary data from the 2003 American Time Use Survey and the United Kingdom Time Use Survey 2000 to examine the time that single, cohabiting, and married parents devote to caring for their children.

BBC News (UK)

January 11, 2006

Pupils should be encouraged to look away from their teacher when answering a question, scientists have found.

Far from daydreaming, children who avert their gaze when considering their response to a question are more likely to come up with the correct answer. Stirling University psychologists found that, when looking away, five-year-olds answered 72% of questions well.

The Heartland Institute

by Andrew T. LeFevre

December 31, 2005

A report released by the Tennessee Center for Policy Research suggests the state's charter school law, which expressly prohibits the authorization of cyber charters, may be preventing thousands of rural students from improving their education.

According to the report, more than a quarter of Tennessee's population is considered rural by the U.S. Census Bureau. Only 11 percent of the adults living in rural Tennessee areas have graduated from college, compared to 23 percent of those living in urban areas.

The New York Times (DC)

by Michael Janofsky

December 7, 2005

WASHINGTON - The report says nearly half the states are doing a poor job of setting high academic standards for science in public schools.

Nearly half the states are doing a poor job of setting high academic standards for science in public schools, according to a new report that examined science in anticipation of 2007, when states will be required to administer tests in the subject under President Bush's signature education law. The report, released Wednesday by the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, appears to support concerns raised by university officials and corporate executives, who say that the failure to produce students well-prepared in science is undermining the country's production of scientists and engineers and putting the nation's economic future in jeopardy.

UC Berkeley News

by Kathleen Maclay

November 1, 2005

While middle-class children benefit modestly from preschool, youngsters from poor families experience two times the gains in early language and mathematics learning, according to a new study of more than 14,000 kindergartners nationwide.

The report - "The Influence of Preschool Centers on Children's Development Nationwide: How Much Is Too Much'" - also examined whether long hours in preschool centers lead to diminishing returns in children's early development. Most surprising, is that the social skills of white, middle-class children suffer- in terms of cooperation, sharing and engagement in classroom tasks - after attending preschool centers for more than six hours a day, compared to similar children who remain at home with a parent prior to starting school.

The Liz Library

by Joint Custody Studies

October 17, 2005

A number of father's rights websites and "position papers" cite the following items to make the claim that "the research" supports joint custody as being either innocuous or actually beneficial for children or women.

Rarely have so many strained arguments and optimistic can-do slants been incorporated into researchers' write-ups as has been the case with findings emanating out of joint custody and father involvement studies.

Guardian Unlimited (UK)

by Yvonne Roberts

October 2, 2005

One of the most detailed studies of UK childcare has concluded that young children who are looked after by their mothers do significantly better in developmental tests than those cared for in nurseries, by childminders or relatives.

The study on children from birth to three will reignite the controversy over the best way to bring up young children. It found babies and toddlers fared worst when they were given group nursery care. Those cared for by friends or grandparents or other relatives did a little better while those looked after by nannies or childminders were rated second only to those cared for by mothers.

FOX News

by Miranda Hitti

October 1, 2005

When the flu strikes, preschool kids may be the first age group affected, passing the flu on to other people, a new study shows.

If so, vaccinating 3- and 4-year-olds against flu might help curb flu epidemics, write researchers in the American Journal of Epidemiology.

TCRecord

by David C. Berliner

August 2, 2005

This analysis is about the role of poverty in school reform. Data from a number of sources are used to make five points. First, that poverty in the US is greater and of longer duration than in other rich nations.

Second, that poverty, particularly among urban minorities, is associated with academic performance Third, that poverty restricts the expression of genetic talent at the lower end of the socioeconomic scale. Fourth, compared to middle-class children, severe medical problems affect impoverished youth. This limits their school achievement as well as their life chances. Fifth, and of greatest interest, is that small reductions in family poverty lead to increases in positive school behavior and better academic performance. The data presented in this study suggest that the most powerful policy for improving our nations’ school achievement is a reduction in family and youth poverty.

      
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