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Education Research

An archive of research links and resources highlighting preschool, kindergarten and child research studies, conducted by educational and independent sources and how they relate to childhood development, family cohesiveness and educational values.

      
 Title   Date   Author   Host 

EWeek

by Ryan Naraine

June 17, 2005

Convinced that the recent upswing in virus and Trojan attacks is directly linked to the creation of botnets for nefarious purposes, a group of high-profile security researchers is fighting back, vigilante-style.

The objective of the group, which operates on closed, invite-only mailing lists, is to pinpoint and ultimately disable the C&C (command-and-control) infrastructure that sends instructions to millions of zombie drone machines hijacked by malicious hackers. "The idea is to share information and figure out where the botnets are getting their instructions from. Once we can identify the command-and-control server, we can act quickly to get it disabled. Once the head goes, that botnet is largely useless," said Roger Thompson, director of malicious content research at Computer Associates International Inc.

Stateline

by Kavan Peterson

June 2, 2005

Fueled by rising immigration and the baby boom echo, U.S. public school enrollment has surpassed the previous all-time high set in 1970 and is expected to increase steadily to a peak of 50 million students in 2014.

The number of students in public elementary and high schools swelled to 49.5 million in 2003, breaking the 48.7 million mark set by school-age baby boomers in 1970. Students identified as minorities made up 42 percent of public school enrollment in 2003, up from 22 percent in 1972, while the share of students who were white decreased to 58 percent from 78 percent.

USA Today

May 25, 2005

At least half of U.S. medical schools are willing to give companies that sponsor studies of drugs and treatments considerable control over the results, says a survey that some doctors found troubling.

Half of the schools said they would let pharmaceutical companies and makers of medical devices draft articles that appear in medical journals, and a quarter would allow them to supply the actual results. But academics draw the line at gag orders that keep researchers from publishing negative findings. Private industry pays for more than two-thirds of medical research at U.S. universities, which has led increasingly to conflict-of-interest suspicions. Two decades ago, the federal government was the main benefactor.

Globe Technology (Canada)

by Jack Kapica

May 18, 2005

Ask Internet safety advocates about the need to protect children from the Internet, and they will tell you the trick is to put the computer in the living room, where surfing can become a family activity.

Yet almost half of respondents to an AOL Canada survey say they would put an Internet-connected computer into the privacy of their children's bedroom. At the other extreme, almost 30 per cent of parents also said they don't intend to allow their children to go on-line at home at all.

Toledo Blade (OH)

by Kim Bates

May 18, 2005

The University of Toledo has teamed up with the University of Virginia to begin studying young children's reading skills and whether regional differences contribute to any challenges they may face.

Two professors at the universities are spearheading the study, which has received nearly $3 million in support from the U.S. Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences. The project, which begins in the fall, initially targets 4-year- olds who live in the Toledo area or the rural regions of Appalachia in Virginia and West Virginia. The same children will be studied through the second grade. About 90 teachers and 540 children are expected to be involved.

Medical News Today (UK)

May 18, 2005

Children of imprisoned mothers generally have insecure relationships with their mothers and caregivers, according to a new study published in the May/June issue of the journal Child Development.

The study, conducted by researchers from the University of Wisconsin, assessed how children thought and felt about their close relationships and family experiences in 54 children ranging from 2 ½ to 7 ½ years old whose mothers were imprisoned. Most of the children lived with their grandparents.

The New York Times

by Tamar Lewin

May 17, 2005

So what if typical 3-year-olds are just out of diapers, still take a daily nap and can't tie their shoes? They are old enough to be expelled, the first national study of expulsion rates in pre-k programs has found.

In fact, preschool children are three times as likely to be expelled as children in kindergarten through 12th grade, according to the new study, by researchers from the Yale Child Study Center. Although preschool expulsion rates varied widely by state and type of setting, the study found that on average, boys were expelled at 4.5 times the rate of girls, African-Americans at twice the rate of Latinos and Caucasians, and 4-year-olds at 1.5 times the rate of 3-year-olds.

The Illinois Leader

May 5, 2005

SB 409 lowers the compulsory attendance age from 7 to 5 years of age. It has only been 4 months since the compulsory attendance age rose to 17 from 16 years of age.

In a federally-sponsored analysis of 8,000 early childhood studies, the Moore Foundation states that "From Piagetian specialist David Elkind in Boston to William Rohwer in Berkeley, Calif., top learning and development authorities warn that early formal school is burning out our children".

BBC News (UK)

May 4, 2005

Children who were under performing in class have seen an improvement in concentration and behaviour after taking a cocktail of natural oils.

More than 120 children aged between six and 12 took part in trials, funded by Durham County Council. Half used a combination of omega-3 fish oil and omega-6 evening primrose oil and half an olive oil placebo. The research showed children's learning and behaviour improved significantly when taking the natural fatty acids.

Nevada Policy Research Institute

by John T. Wenders, Ph.D.* and Andrea D. Clements, Ph.D.

May 3, 2005

Homeschool children in the state now make up about 1 percent of all school-age children. Public school advocates have argued that homeschooling "costs" the school system money.

Driven by parents' beliefs that homeschool learning environments can be superior to those of public or private schools, as well as a desire by parents to spend more time together as a family, Nevada homeschooling has undergone remarkable growth during the past decade.

      
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