Reliable Answers - News and Commentary

Education Research

An archive of research links and resources highlighting preschool, kindergarten and child research studies, conducted by educational and independent sources and how they relate to childhood development, family cohesiveness and educational values.

      
 Title   Date   Author   Host 

bakeryandsnacks.com

February 19, 2013

Regulatory limits on the levels of moulds and toxins present naturally in foods produced from grain crops should be expanded to include so-called "masked mycotoxins," suggest researchers.

The warnings come from researchers based in Italy who explain that 'masked' mycotoxins - that change from harmless to potentially harmful forms of moulds when already in the body - are not currently covered by regulations. Writing in Chemical Research in Toxicology, the team note that many health experts regard mycotoxins as a serious chronic dietary risk factor; ranking them a greater risk than any potential health threats from pesticides or insecticides.

facebook.com

February 16, 2013

Basel-based agrichemical giant Syngenta on Friday urged Brussels to withdraw plans to slap a two-year ban on so-called neonicotinoid pesticides, saying blaming them for bee deaths was wrongheaded.

Last month, the EFSA said that neonicotinoid insecticides used in maize, rapeseed, sunflower and cotton cultivation posed "disturbing" risks to with bees and other pollinating insects hugely important for food production, especially of fruit. EFSA said the insecticides attack the central nervous system of insects, causing paralysis and death.

foodnavigator.com

by Caroline Scott-Thomas

February 16, 2013

Bayer CropScience has defended the use of neonicotinoid insecticides following a report from the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) identifying three such substances as potentially risky to bees.

EFSA's report highlighted three neonicotinoid insecticides - clothianidin, imidacloprid and thiamethoxam - saying that they should only be used 'on crops not attractive to honey bees'. The investigation into insecticides is part of broader research into potential causes of colony collapse disorder, the rapid loss of adult bees from a colony or hive.

CNS News

January 15, 2013

Authorities at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport have held up a shipment of 18 human heads sent from Rome and bound for a facility in the U.S. where they would be used in anatomical research.

A spokeswoman for the Cook County Medical Examiner's Office, Mary Paleologos (PEHL'-ee-oh-loh-gohs), says the heads were properly preserved, wrapped and tagged as human specimens and there is no suggestion of foul play. It was not immediately clear why customs officials had held up the shipment.

CNS News

January 7, 2013

The Supreme Court won't stop the government's funding of embryonic stem cell research, despite some researchers' complaints that the work relies on destroyed human embryos.

The high court on Monday refused to hear an appeal from two scientists who have been challenging the funding for the work. The U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia earlier this year threw out their lawsuit challenging federal funding for the research, which is used in pursuit of cures to deadly diseases. Opponents claimed the National Institutes of Health was violating the 1996 Dickey-Wicker law that prohibits taxpayer financing for work that harms an embryo.

theatlantic.com

by Megan Garber

January 4, 2013

That day, my friends, is today.

So this just happened: William Shatner, he of Priceline and also of spoken-word poetry but mostly of Star Trek, is also William Shatner of Twitter. And this afternoon, the actor took to the service to ask a question of the Canadian Space Agency's Chris Hadfield, who is currently serving as the International Space Station's Flight Engineer for Expedition 34 -- and who has indeed been tweeting from space...

alternet.org

by Fred Gardner

October 27, 2012

Components of marijuana smoke, although they damage cells in respiratory tissue, somehow prevent them from becoming malignant. But headlines announcing "Pot Doesn't Cause Cancer" did not ensue.

Tashkin will review his findings and discuss current research this Thursday in Santa Monica, California as part of a course for doctors accredited by the University of California San Francisco. (It is open to the public; pre-registration is $95.)

theatlantic.com

by Lindsay Abrams

October 22, 2012

Should we allow highly at-risk children in the foster care system who are in need of homes and loving families to be adopted by homosexual couples?

This is the first study to compare children who were adopted out of foster care by gay men, lesbian women, and heterosexual couples, and to track their progress over time, explains lead author Justin Lavner, a doctoral candidate at UCLA. The researchers followed 82 children in Los Angeles County -- 22 of whom were adopted by homosexual parents at the average age of 4 -- and evaluated them after two months, one year, and two years after they were placed with their adoptive families.

childrensrights.org

October 18, 2012

A massive review of Massachusetts foster care shows that nearly one in five children who have been in state care for at least two years have suffered confirmed abuse or neglect - all while in the custody of the state Department of Children and Families.

A report that reviewed case files of more than 480 children shows that DCF is failing to meet its own policies and performance targets. The findings are consistent with federal studies that rank Massachusetts among the bottom 10 child welfare systems in the United States when it comes to ensuring children are safe in foster care and have stable placements.

space.com

by Clara Moskowitz

September 19, 2012

Faster than light travel may actually be possible using a warp drive to bend space around a starship. New calculations suggest such a vehicle would require less energy than once thought.

A warp drive to achieve faster-than-light travel - a concept popularized in television's Star Trek - may not be as unrealistic as once thought, scientists say. A warp drive would manipulate space-time itself to move a starship, taking advantage of a loophole in the laws of physics that prevent anything from moving faster than light. A concept for a real-life warp drive was suggested in 1994 by Mexican physicist Miguel Alcubierre; however, subsequent calculations found that such a device would require prohibitive amounts of energy.

      






[SmokedFish] - smoked fish recipes, preparation, questions and answers

Take me to the top

Your Ad Here?

Contact our Marketing department for information about advertising on this domain.


Take me to the top

We invite you
to visit:

Professional Web Hosting and Design Services: 12 Point Design Local Homeschool provides the most up-to-date support group listings in a geographical and searchable index Budget Homeschool Kidjacked -- To seize control of a child, by use of force SaferPC dispels security misunderstandings and provides you with a solid understanding of viruses and computer security Reliable Answers - developer information, current news, human interest and legislative news Twain Harte Photo Gallery - Twain Harte, CA - The closest you can get to Heaven on Earth Cranial Laser & Neurolymphatic Release Techniques (CLNRT) - Experience dramatic pain reduction At Summit Chiropractic our mission is to improve your quality of life - We know that health is much more than just not feeling pain Visit UniveralPreschool.com to learn about your preschool options. Dave's Quick Search Deskbar
Reliable Answers.com/hs/research.asp AddThis Social Bookmark Button
Google