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Food and Nutrition in the News

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After watching several documentaries about our food supply and learning just how deficient in nutrients the food we consume has become over the past 30-years, our family has decided to make some serious changes. We are buying organic, eating in season and buying locally. Our meat is grassfed, our bread in homebaked and I feel good about what my family is eating.

If you aren't aware of the danger genentically modified corn and soy products present to your families diet, continue reading. Find out the latest news and commentary on GMO food sources, eating and buying organic foods, nutritional news, food related health issues and much more.

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 Title   Date   Author   Host 

reason.com

by Zenon Evans

July 11, 2014

The public just got some new insight into one of the last year's spiciest (and fishiest) political kerfuffles: the push by the city council of Irwindale, California to shut down Huy Fong Foods, the makers of Sriracha hot sauce.

The tireless freedom-of-information requesters at MuckRock yesterday published internal council documents, revealing theatrically furious communication among the local government officials and a desire to exploit regulations to force the company into submission. First, to recap the situation. The squabbling began last October when reports emerged that some residents of the 1,500-person industrial town experienced watery eyes and sore throats due to the smells emitted by the Huy Fong factory. However, L.A. Weekly's Dennis Romero was skeptical, noting that "most of the odor complaints have come from four nearby homes, one of which is occupied by the relative of a city councilman. That councilman, Hector Ortiz, recused himself from discussion and voting on the matter because, he says, he owns property near the plant." And, the city was trying to sell property next to the factory at the time.

occupymonsanto360.org

by Zack Kaldveer

October 23, 2012

The $36 million No on 37 campaign, bankrolled by $20 million from the world's six largest pesticide companies, has been caught in yet another lie, this time possibly criminal.

These companies and their allies in the junk food industry know that their profit margins may suffer if consumers have a choice whether to purchase genetically engineered foods or not. And that's why opponents are spending nearly a million dollars per day trying to make Prop 37 complicated. But really it's simple - we have the right to know what's in our food. To date, the No on 37 campaign has been able to repeat one lie after another with near impunity. But has this pattern of deceit finally caught up to it?

benswann.com

by Zach McAuliffe

June 11, 2014

A new report released by the Drug Policy Alliance and the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies, says the DEA has spent the last four decades thwarting marijuana research which carries the potential of reclassification for the drug.

"The DEA has argued for decades that there is insufficient evidence to support rescheduling marijuana," reads the executive summary of the report. "At the same time, it has... acted in a manner intended to systematically impede scientific research." Currently, marijuana is classified as a Schedule I drug, meaning the federal government does not recognize any acceptable uses for the drug, including medicinal uses. The status of Schedule I also means the drugs in this category cannot receive federal funding for research, medicinal or otherwise. Marijuana is joined on the Schedule I tier by peyote, LSD, and heroine.

New Mexico Daily Lobo

by Zach Gould

February 25, 2010

I want to eat cows. I want to eat ribs, burgers, steaks and even bottom round roast (the butt). I would love to swim in the fluffy meat pillows of steak goodness, indulging my continuously growing gluttony.

For the typical family of suburbia, waking up at 7 a.m. to go to work, grabbing a convenience-laden breakfast burrito from McDonald's with a side of coffee water is second nature. I get it. Do I care what you eat? No. I couldn't care less, and the last thing I want to do is make you feel guilty. But, what you eat effects what I eat.

triedandtasty.com

by Yvonne Feld

February 26, 2015

Easter rapidly approaching, I knew that mom's everywhere would soon be thinking about coloring Easter eggs for the hunts that will be taking place all over.

We've always got fruits and vegetables on hand, as my husband is a juicing fiend. I knew it would be easy to gather exactly what I needed to have a wide variety of colors. Brown onions, red onions, beets, blueberries, spinach, red cabbage, turmeric, and paprika.

althealthworks.com

by Yelena Sukhoterina

June 14, 2016

Carrol Krause, a former reporter for the Herald-Times of Bloomington, Indiana, had to retire from her journalism career because of an ovarian cancer diagnosis in 2014.

A few months ago she started having digestive issues and could no longer eat normal food. What hospice workers brought her as meal replacements horrified her. Krause writes: "Hospice had the very best of intentions, [but] the stuff they sent over was not real FOOD. In fact, I'm outraged at the idea that they feed this stuff to dying people." What the hospice provided to Krause was a bag full of products by Ensure: pudding, shakes, and a drink that pretends to be apple juice.

breitbart.com

by Wynton Hall

October 1, 2012

A new report by the Government Accountability Institute finds that JP Morgan has made at least $560,492,596 since 2004 processing the Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) cards of 18 of the 24 states it has under contract for the food stamp program.

Indeed, JP Morgan's Christopher Paton told Bloomberg News that food stamps are big business for the big bank: "We are the largest processor of food stamps in the country...[the EBT program] is a very important business to JP Morgan. It's an important business in terms of its size and scale.... Right now volumes have gone through the roof in the past couple of years or so. The good news from JP Morgan's perspective is the infrastructure that we built has been able to cope with that increase in volume."

ct.com

by Wtxx-Ltv

January 17, 2012

Investigations in Oregon, Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, New York and other states have in recent years found disturbing evidence of police officers abusing steroids. But Connecticut police insist they've never seen it here.

A national expert who's been studying steroid use in all types of subcultures from athletics to the military believes "tens of thousands" of cops all across the U.S. are on such illegal drugs. But the head of the largest police union in this state, a man who spent 20 years with the Milford P.D., says the issue has never even been raised in any Connecticut disciplinary hearing he knows about. A recent scandal in New Jersey turned up 248 public safety officials - most of them cops - who were getting steroids prescribed by a steroid-abusing doctor, and New Jersey officials responded by ordering random police drug testing. But a Connecticut State Police spokesman says his department doesn't do that. Just last month, a federal appeals court ruled a New Jersey police chief was within his rights to order several of his officers to undergo testing for steroids, strip them of their weapons and put them on desk duty.

thestoryoflibertyblog.com

by Woothemes

January 12, 2012

The person who may be responsible for more food-related illness and death than anyone in history has been made the US food safety czar. This is no joke.

Michael Taylor, MONSANTO’S VICE PRESIDENT, was just appointed senior advisor to the commissioner of the FDA. This is the same man that was in charge of FDA policy when GMO’s were allowed into the US food supply without undergoing a single test to determine their safety. He “had been Monsanto’s attorney before becoming policy chief at the FDA [and then] he became Monsanto’s Vice President and chief lobbyist. This month [he] became the senior advisor to the commissioner of the FDA. He is now America’s food safety czar. This is no joke.”

takepart.com

by Willy Blackmore

June 23, 2014

Palmer amaranth, much of which is resistent to herbicides, is showing up in more states.

Quinoa may be a superfood, but Palmer amaranth is a superweed. The plant, which can grow up to seven feet tall and seeds very heavily, has been the scourge of Southern farmers for years, but now that it's showing up in Iowa fields, in the heart of industrial American agriculture, there's new, growing concern over its spread-and its increased resistance to herbicides.

      

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