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Technology in the News

Technology is constantly changing and providing the casual user with challenges never dreamed of. Technology in the News is provided in an effort to assist you in getting the most out of your computer, while avoiding some of the pitfalls. Your computer really isn't out to get you. Why not learn to be friends?

      
 Title   Date   Author   Host 

scientificamerican.com

by Tia Ghose

April 2, 2013

From "significant" to "natural," here are seven scientific terms that can prove troublesome for the public and across research disciplines

Hypothesis. Theory. Law. These scientific words get bandied about regularly, yet the general public usually gets their meaning wrong. Now, one scientist is arguing that people should do away with these misunderstood words altogether and replace them with the word "model." But those aren't the only science words that cause trouble, and simply replacing the words with others will just lead to new, widely misunderstood terms, several other scientists said. "A word like 'theory' is a technical scientific term," said Michael Fayer, a chemist at Stanford University. "The fact that many people understand its scientific meaning incorrectly does not mean we should stop using it. It means we need better scientific education."

reason.com

by Nick Gillespie

August 1, 2013

From a story in today's Wash Post titled, "Libertarians Flex Their Muscle in the GOP"...

Libertarianism once again appears to be on the rise, particularly among the young. But its alliance with the Republican establishment is fraying, as demonstrated by the increasingly personal war of words between two leading potential 2016 presidential contenders.... The "once again" is appreciated, though any honest appraisal of partisan politics would acknowledge that libertarianism has been the next big thing for going on 45 years, when the future editor of Wired magazine, Louis Rossetto and his college pal Stan Lehr published "The New Right Credo: Libertarianism" in the January 10, 1971 issue of The New York Times Magazine.

f-secure.com

by Mikko

November 1, 2010

The infamous Sony Rootkit case is five years old today. The Sony rootkit was shipped on millions on music CDs from well-known artists such as Celine Dion, Neil Diamond and Ricky Martin.

Smashing Magazine

by Ben Gremillion

December 28, 2012

The most valuable part of a computer is also its most fragile: Data are the wealth of a digital lifestyle, a currency of which many notes are irreplaceable.

At least, that's how I felt staring at a "Confirm you want to wipe your hard disk" message, my finger poised over the mouse. During an emergency is a bad time to plan for one. It's the feeling one might get jumping from a plane before checking one's parachute. That's one experience I'd rather avoid, but it happened. Not the skydiving part. My OS was dying, and I wasn't prepared.

F-Secure Weblog

by Sean

October 18, 2011

Why are people so willing to give away their personal information to complete strangers?

It's because humans want to share information. And in fact, they share information a lot more freely than other "things" such as goods and services. Which of these are you most likely to provide without thinking much about it?...

sourceforge.net

by rbowen

February 8, 2013

You may have seen an article yesterday about "ransomware" on SourceForge and Github websites.

The exploit in question leads victims to fake sites, where their PCs are then infected with the offending malicious ransomware. First, we would like to state that no malware in this instance was hosted on SourceForge, but rather the content on SourceForge linked to malware hosted off-site. We wanted to also assure you that within minutes of becoming aware of the problem, our team here at SourceForge, had removed the offending content and blocked the addresses from which it was being created. Likewise, it's apparent that our peers at Github took similar actions to address the problem.

xrepublic.tv

August 10, 2013

F-Secure Weblog

by Sean

July 12, 2012

There's a reaction to yesterday's post which suggests we find fault with Google for "not doing their job" by letting malware into Play. No. We didn't take Google to task on the matter of prevention. It's about its response.

It literally took less than 10 seconds for us to locate a second dummy account being used to push alternate versions of Dropdialer. Google's Android Security team had already removed the first two threats more than six hours earlier. Why was the "Vahtang Maliev" account still online? Does "Android Security" not know how to utilize Google Search?

photographyisnotacrime.com

by Carlos Miller

February 27, 2013

In what is probably the most educating 30 seconds you will spend today, a man drives by an accident scene in Kentucky with his camera recording, only to be ordered to turn his camera off.

The driver immediately tells him, "no, fuck you," and keeps driving. The video was posted today on Live Leak with the following description: "I was on my way home from work and saw a pickup upside down and decided to film it as we passed. No one was hurt in this accident. Right to film in public and freedom of speech are both used in this video lol." While it's not the most courteous response, it's even more discourteous to use a position of authority to bark an unlawful order.

buzzfeed.com

by Justine Sharrock

July 21, 2013

For nine months, this Utah ISP had a little black box in the corner, courtesy of the NSA. Its owner tells his story.

When people say the feds are monitoring what people are doing online, what does that mean? How does that work? When, and where, does it start? Pete Ashdown, CEO of XMission, an internet service provider in Utah, knows. He received a Foreign Intelligence Service Act (FISA) warrant in 2010 mandating he let the feds monitor one of his customers, through his facility. He also received a broad gag order. In his own words: The first thing I do when I get a law enforcement request is look for a court signature on it. Then I pass it to my attorneys and say, "Is this legitimate? Does this qualify as a warrant?" If it does, then we will respond to it. We are very up front that we respond to warrants. If it isn't, then the attorneys write back: "We don't believe it is in jurisdiction or is constitutional. We are happy to respond if you do get an FBI request in jurisdiction or you get a court order to do so."

      
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