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Technology in the News

Technology is constantly changing and providing the casual user with challenges never dreamed of. Technology in the News is provided in an effort to assist you in getting the most out of your computer, while avoiding some of the pitfalls. Your computer really isn't out to get you. Why not learn to be friends?

      
 Title   Date   Author   Host 

fight4future.tumblr.com

July 7, 2014

Over the weekend a detailed report in the Washington Post caught the U.S. government in more lies about the scope of it's dragnet surveillance programs.

The Post showed that the NSA intercepted communications from ordinary people 9 times more often than from "targets" suspected of any wrongdoing. People are outraged. And we should be. Any politician that plans to keep their job should be doing everything they can to put an end to these illegal and unethical surveillance practices. Infuriatingly, *tomorrow* the Senate Intelligence Committee is rushing to advance "CISA," a bill that would give the NSA more access to our data than ever before, and give companies like Facebook and Google legal immunity for violating our privacy.

policestateusa.com

July 6, 2014

"The fact that the government can and is eavesdropping on patrons in libraries has a chilling effect."

Using the broad powers granted under the USA PATRIOT Act, the FBI demanded that 4 librarians produce private information about library patrons' reading habits, then used an endless gag order to force them to remain silent about the request for the rest of their lives under penalty of prison time. In July 2005, two FBI agents came to the office of the Library Connection, located in Windsor, Connecticut. The Library Connection is a nonprofit co-op of library databases that arranges record-sharing between 27 different libraries. It facilitates book rental tracking and other services.

RT

July 6, 2014

All internet companies collecting personal information from Russian citizens are obliged to store that data inside the country, according to a new law. Its supporters cite security reasons, while opponents see it as an infringement of freedoms.

The law, passed Friday by the State Duma, the lower chamber of the Russian parliament, would come into force Sept. 1, 2016. The authors of the legislation believe that it gives both foreign and domestic internet companies enough time to create data-storage facilities in Russia. The bill was proposed after some Russian MPs deemed it unwise that the bulk of Russians' online personal data is held on foreign servers, mostly in the US. "In this way foreign states possess full information, correspondence, photographs of not only our individuals, but companies as well," one of the authors of the bill, Vadim Dengin of the Liberal Democratic Party (LDPR) told Itar-Tass. "All of the [internet] companies, including the foreign ones, you are welcome to store that information, but please create data centers in Russia so that it can be controlled by Roscomnadzor (the Federal Communications Supervisory Service) and there would be a guarantee from the state that [the data] isn't going anywhere."

RT

July 4, 2014

Investigators in the United States won't be handed over the decryption keys necessary to access digital data seized from the home of internet entrepreneur Kim Dotcom in early 2012, a New Zealand judge ruled this week.

Authorities raided Dotcom's mansion outside of Auckland, New Zealand, nearly two-and-a-half years ago as part of an operation conducted with the aid of the US Federal Bureau of Investigation in response to felony copyright infringement and racketeer allegations brought in America against the German-born hacker-turned-businessman. Computer hard drives seized from Dotcom's Coatesville, NZ home were cloned and given to the FBI after the incident. This past January, though, the New Zealand Court of Appeals ruled that the American feds should never have legally acquired the copied data.

RT

July 1, 2014

‚ÄčAll of the National Security Agency files accessed by former contractor Edward Snowden could be published in the month of July if vaguely worded predictions tweeted this week from the digital library site Cryptome prove to be correct.

A series of micro-messages published by the website - a portal for sharing sensitive documents that predates WikiLeaks by a decade - suggest further Snowden leaks may be on the way. "During July all Snowden docs released" reads an excerpt from one Cryptome tweet sent on Monday this week. "July is when war begins unless headed off by Snowden full release of crippling intel. After war begins not a chance of release," reads another tweet sent from Cryptome on Monday this week. "Only way war can be avoided. Warmongerers [sic] are on a rampage. So, yes, citizens holding Snowden docs will do the right thing," insists another.

RT

July 1, 2014

Previously undisclosed files leaked to the media by former intelligence contractor Edward Snowden now show that the United States National Security Agency has been authorized to spy on persons in all but four countries.

The Washington Post published on Monday official documents provided by Mr. Snowden that shows new proof concerning the extent of the NSA's vast surveillance apparatus. One of the documents-a file marked "top secret" from 2010 and approved by the US Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court-shows that the NSA has been authorized to conduct surveillance on 193 foreign government, as well as various factions and organizations around the world, including the International Monetary Fund, the European Union and the International Atomic Energy Agency. "Virtually no foreign government is off-limits for the National Security Agency, which has been authorized to intercept information from individuals 'concerning' all but four countries on Earth, according to top-secret documents," journalists Ellen Nakashima and Barton Gellman wrote for the Post.

naturalnews.com

July 1, 2014

Occasionally, a government agency may deliver a somewhat helpful oversight service, at least in terms of consumerism.

The FCC (Federal Communications Commission) provides oversight and reports on discrepancies among various ISP (internet service provider) advertised speeds compared to actual speeds and reports them. Overall, the FCC recently reported that most ISP groups provided at, just below, or just above their advertised speeds. Only a few were considerably off the mark between what they advertised and what they produced.

reason.com

June 30, 2014

The surprising thing about the Supreme Court's decision on police searches of cell phones was its unanimity.

The surprising thing about the Supreme Court's decision on police searches of cell phones was its unanimity. Aligned on the same side of a major law enforcement issue were liberal and conservative justices who normally fight like cats and dogs. All agreed that it's intolerable to let cops ransack the voluminous contents of mobile phones. Who could disagree? Well, cops, of course. And the Obama administration.

thefreethoughtproject.com

June 30, 2014

Officer Jeremy Dear has a history of a "malfunctioning" body camera during his applications of force.

According to Dear's personnel file, in January 2013, he helped break up a Downtown brawl and, in the process, he "did strike (the 22-year-old suspect) several times in his facial area with a closed fist," according to his description of the incident. Dear wrote that the man had struck him in the jaw and was resisting arrest, according to the personnel file. His lapel video was not on, but his partner's was on for the beginning and aftermath, according to the file.

RT

June 29, 2014

Facebook is locked in a legal battle over a court ruling that forced the site to hand over data from almost 400 profiles to authorities. The social media site argues the decision is unconstitutional and violates the Fourth Amendment.

Last summer, a New York court ordered Facebook to release data from the accounts of 381 people, who were suspected of being involved in a disability fraud case. The information included photos, private messages and other data. The social media platform had previously been unable to go public about their legal struggle against the "largest data request" by a government body because of a court gagging order. However, Chris Sonderby, Facebook Deputy General Counsel published a blog post on Thursday speaking out about the case after a New York judge granted permission to go public.

      
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