Reliable Answers - News and Commentary

Politics in the News

Whether you are a libertarian, conservative, NRA member or simply a citizen concerned with today's political climate, you will find news items of interest and relevance on Reliable Answers "Politics in the News."

What message are our legislators sending to voters, when they publicly admit they haven't done their job? How many bills are passed each year that policymakers haven't even bothered to read? This is disgraceful. This is called dereliction of duties and we must demand a stop to this practice.

      
 Title   Date   Author   Host 

projects.jsonline.com

by Devi Shastri

October 7, 2017

KEY WEST, Fla. - The crowd at the Monroe County town hall meeting was not intimidated by the panel of experts arrayed on the stage before them.

It was clear almost immediately that Nimmo and his colleagues were not salesmen, based on a review of a video of the two-and-a-half hour meeting. When Nimmo said it would be premature to say with certainty that the modified-mosquitoes would stop disease, the statement was met with laughter.

grist.org

by Heather Smith

September 18, 2017

They had been built fast, and not to last. The fact that some people were still living in them because they had never gotten enough money to rebuild their homes, or had run afoul of unethical contractors.

But in the oil fields of Alexander, where Shapiro found them, people had, at best, only a dim memory of hearing something bad about the trailers on the late night news. Only one person in the improvised trailer park near the Tumbleweed Inn knew where the trailers were from. Now 19, he'd lived in one as a child, after his family's home was destroyed when the levees around New Orleans broke in 2005. "It feels like home," he said, looking around the park. "Not the landscape. The trailers. I'm used to it."

thoughtco.com

by Earth Talk

September 17, 2017

An ongoing drought has threatened groundwater supplies across India, and many villagers in rural areas are blaming Coca-Cola for aggravating the problem.

An ongoing drought has threatened groundwater supplies across India, and many villagers in rural areas are blaming Coca-Cola for aggravating the problem. Coca-Cola operates 58 water-intensive bottling plants in India. In the southern Indian village of Plachimada in Kerala state, for example, persistent droughts have dried up groundwater and local wells, forcing many residents to rely on water supplies trucked in daily by the government.

nytimes.com

September 1, 2017

A white nationalist rally that turned violent in Charlottesville, Va., on Aug. 12 brought renewed attention to dozens of Confederate monuments around the country.

Many government officials, including Representative Nancy Pelosi of California, the House Democratic leader, have called to remove statues, markers and other monuments that celebrate controversial Civil War era figures from public grounds. There are likely hundreds of such monuments in the United States.

sacbee.com

by Phillip Reese

August 29, 2017

More than 97,000 California public school students have been diagnosed as autistic, a number that has risen seven-fold since 2001, according to the latest special education data from the California Department of Education.

The figure represent a jump of about 6,500, or 7 percent, from 2014-15 to 2015-16. The increase was especially sharp among kindergartners, where autism cases grew by 17 percent last year. More than one of every 65 kindergartners in California public schools is classified as autistic. Since 2006, the number of autistic students statewide has risen by between 5,000 and 7,000 every year, state figures show.

csmonitor.com

by Doug Struck

August 17, 2017

In rural Nebraska, a determined couple are among the last holdouts to the Keystone XL Pipeline project, which they say could pose a threat to an important underground water source.

The cornfields of Nebraska sweep over gentle hills, disappearing at the horizon. To the modern farmer they are mathematical creations: the calculus of total acres, fertilizer per acre, inches of rainfall, tons of herbicide, radius of the giant pivot irrigator, and square feet of crops lost at the edges. Rows are planted with computer-driven precision; corn is sold when the financial analytics say the price is right.

forbes.com

by Avik Roy

July 29, 2017

If you've been concerned about the fate of veterans' health care in the U.S., look to its cousin across the pond. A subsidiary of the government-run British National Health Service has decided to bar obese patients and smokers...

"Major surgery poses much higher risks for severely overweight patients who smoke," said an NHS England spokesman. "So local [providers] are entirely right to ensure these patients first get support to lose weight and try and stop smoking before their hip or knee operation." The change "saves the NHS and taxpayers millions of pounds."

investors.com

by Victor Davis Hanson

July 10, 2017

There was more of the same old, same old California news recently. Some 62% of state roads have been rated poor or mediocre. There were more predictions of huge cost overruns and yearly losses on high-speed rail -- before the first mile of track.

After years of drought, California has not built a single new reservoir. Instead, scarce fresh aqueduct water is still being diverted to sea. Thousands of rural central California homes, in Dust Bowl fashion, have been abandoned due to a sinking aquifer and dry wells. One in three American welfare recipients resides in California. Almost a quarter of the state population lives below or near the poverty line. Yet the state's gas and electricity prices are among the nation's highest.

statesmanjournal.com

by Diane Dietz

July 5, 2017

Salem Rep. Jodi Hack voted in favor of the program, saying her vote "is not for sale."

House Bill 3078 would also expand addiction treatment, allow 30 days additional end-of-sentence transitional leave for inmates with good behavior and shorten the one-year presumptive sentence for women convicted of first-degree theft or identity theft.

libertyheadlines.com

June 20, 2017

Trump's proposal to overhaul the U.S. food stamp program, or the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) as it's currently known, has brought with it a widely overlooked fee that could end up costing food retailers billions.

The Office of Management and Budget said the fee would be assessed when stores sign up and would require renewal after five years. The budget office said the amount would depend on the size and type of retailer, but the president's budget estimates that the fee would generate $2.4 billion in revenue over the next decade.

      
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