Reliable Answers - News and Commentary

Nature in the News

Channel Island Fox at the Coyote Point Museum, San Mateo, CA

Channel Island Fox

Nature in the News contains interesting, entertaining and educational articles about wildlife, nature and ecology issues. This news page contains information on everything from Yosemite rock slides and mountain lion legislation, to global warming, climate change and tiny little hummingbirds.

If you aren't sure where you stand on the issues, don't feel alone. The world we live in becomes more complex every single day. Is the earth as fragile as some would have us believe or has it endured because it's quite resilient? You decide. These issues are not going away and will continue to plague us with complex problems that will require us all to make hard decisions.

You will find plenty of food for thought and information to contemplate. Be sure to check back often.

      
 Title   Date   Author   Host 

mtv.com

December 5, 2015

There's no way to work in these waters, where you are literally neck deep in feces in some places, and not be afraid of the health effects.

According to the AP's 2013 report, "In the neon green waters around the site of the future Olympic Park, the average fecal pollution rate is 78 times that of the Brazilian government's 'satisfactory' limit - and 195 times the level considered safe in the U.S."

sacramento.cbslocal.com

by Leigh Martinez

December 4, 2015

A family in who lost their home in the Butte Fire is getting a Christmas surprise from employees at a Stockton store.

The Rainier family's house was destroyed by the September fire, and they've only recently moved from campground tents into a temporary house. The Stockton Lowe's store had planned a holiday party and giveaway for all Butte Fire victims left homeless.

abc.net.au

by Eliza Buzacott-Speer

December 2, 2015

More than 300 whales are found washed up in one of the largest die-offs on record.

Vreni Haussermann of the Huinay Scientific Centre was one of the scientists who made the discovery. "It was an apocalyptic sight. I'd never seen anything like it," Ms Haussermann said. Scientists launched an expedition to count the animals after 20 sei whales were reported dead in April.

news.discovery.com

by Discovery News

November 28, 2015

According to National Geographic, the animals were most likely sei whales, and it's not yet clear to scientists what caused the mass die-off.

The whales were first discovered in June, and scientists had planned to report their findings in a scientific journal. But the news has just been leaked in Chilean media, according to National Geographic.

uniondemocrat.com

by Guy McCarthy

November 10, 2015

Trees fall year-round in the Mother Lode from factors including age, stress, infestation and structural weakness. In recent weeks, several trees have fallen, from Twain Harte to Columbia, and some of the falling trees have coincided with wet weather.

Telltale orange, red and brown patches are visible along the Highway 4, Highway 108 and Highway 120 corridors in and near the Stanislaus National Forest and in Yosemite National Park. But there's more going on with pines and oaks than drought-stress and infestation, said Scott Nye, owner of Twain Harte Tree Service.

japantimes.co.jp

by Philip Brasor

November 7, 2015

South Korean director Kim Ki-duk is a noted provocateur. His latest movie, "Stop," is about a Japanese couple who were living near the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant when it suffered a meltdown in March 2011.

They evacuate to Tokyo, where the wife is pestered by an underground cult that insists she abort her presumably irradiated fetus, and she becomes convinced she should. Her husband is equally convinced there is nothing wrong with the baby and ties his wife up to prevent her from doing anything. Kim's point seems to be that whichever position you take on the nuclear accident, it will invariably drive you insane.

globalresearch.ca

November 7, 2015

It came as no surprise, to those following the ongoing nuclear melt-downs at Fukushima, and the continuation of pouring seawater to cool the Corium masses, the T.E.P.C.O would "simply run out of room" for the highly radioactive waste water.

TEPCO has no choice but to pour the cooling water straight back into the Pacific Ocean from whence it came, after assurances that this practice was never going to happen. The implications and ramifications for the Pacific ocean, and food chains around the world, is a fact and an eventuality, no longer a possibility. As this is a first time Global crisis phenomenon, there is no data, no science and no research to lead us on with a solution, nor guide us with any protective measures as to the ongoing crisis. TEPCO released the following information on sheer volume of the highly toxic, deadly radiocative releases going on, on a daily basis from Fukushima.

ideas.ted.com

November 2, 2015

To restore the ocean ecosystem, you're saying we must put an end to overfishing and bottom trawling, which you liken to "catching songbirds with a bulldozer." Is there such a thing as eating fish responsibly these days?

Except for those living in coastal communities - or even inland if we're talking freshwater species - for most people, eating fish is a choice, not a necessity. Some people believe that the sole purpose of fish is for us to eat them. They are seen as commodities. Yet wild fish, like wild birds, have a place in the natural ecosystem which outweighs their value as food. They're part of the systems that make the planet function in our favor, and we should be protecting them because of their importance to the ocean.

lohud.com

October 28, 2015

In the late 1800s, one of every four trees in our forests was the American chestnut. These stately native trees provided valuable and handsome timber, excellent firewood and plentiful, nutritious nuts for both people and wildlife.

The two dozen tiny trees (12-inch "plantlets") were planted in May at a 1-acre site on the Camp Fire Club's 232-acre grounds and will be monitored closely by federal officials over the next few years. "The trees are 99.9 percent pure American chestnuts, with the addition of one wheat gene" to protect the tree from the killing fungus, says Preston Bruenn, the club's Conservation Committee chairman who is also an ESF alumnus. The main lodge of the Chappaqua club was built from American chestnut in the early 1900s.

washingtonpost.com

by Steve Volk

October 28, 2015

A prominent Agriculture Department scientist is alleging that he was suspended after complaining that the agency was blocking his research into the harmful effects of pesticides on pollinators, such as bees and butterflies.

In a whistleblower complaint filed Wednesday, Jonathan Lundgren, an entomologist and 11-year veteran of the USDA's Agricultural Research Service, says his supervisors retaliated against him by suspending him initially for 30 days before reducing it to 14 days.

      
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