Reliable Answers - News and Commentary

Nature in the News

Channel Island Fox at the Coyote Point Museum, San Mateo, CA

Channel Island Fox

Nature in the News contains interesting, entertaining and educational articles about wildlife, nature and ecology issues. This news page contains information on everything from Yosemite rock slides and mountain lion legislation, to global warming, climate change and tiny little hummingbirds.

If you aren't sure where you stand on the issues, don't feel alone. The world we live in becomes more complex every single day. Is the earth as fragile as some would have us believe or has it endured because it's quite resilient? You decide. These issues are not going away and will continue to plague us with complex problems that will require us all to make hard decisions.

You will find plenty of food for thought and information to contemplate. Be sure to check back often.

      
 Title   Date   Author   Host 

naturalnews.com

by David Gutierrez

June 17, 2015

By 2016, nearly as much radiation from the Fukushima disaster will have reached the North American West Coast as was initially scattered over Japan during the nuclear explosions.

Approximately 800 terabecquerels' worth of cesium-137 (Cs-137) alone is expected to reach North America by next year, accounting for just 5 percent of the Cs-137 spilled into the ocean as a result of the disaster.

news.investors.com

by Rep. Devin Nunes

June 12, 2015

For decades, extreme environmentalists have tried to remove 1.3 million acres of California farmland from production by depriving farmers of water.

From Merced all the way down to Bakersfield, and on the entire west side of the Valley as well as part of the east side, productive agriculture would end and the land would return to some ideal state of nature. I was stunned by the vicious audacity of their goal - and I quickly learned how dedicated they were to realizing it. Much of the media and many politicians blame the San Joaquin Valley's water shortage on drought, but that is merely an aggravating factor. From my experience representing California's agricultural heartland, I know that our water crisis is not an unfortunate natural occurrence; it is the intended result of a long-term campaign waged by radical environmentalists who resorted to political pressure as well as profuse lawsuits.

desmogblog.com

by Farron Cousins

June 7, 2015

In August of last year, 21.6 million acres of the Gulf of Mexico were auctioned off to the dirty energy industry so that they could expand their offshore fracking activities.

As DeSmog's Steve Horn reported at that time, many of the leases sold by the government in August were located in the Lower Tertiary Basin, an area defined by hard-to-penetrate rock where the crude is located in deep water, making the practice of hydraulic fracturing exceptionally risky and prone to environmental disaster. It wasn't until the lease sale that the media - and the American public - became painfully aware of the fact that we know so little about what the industry is actually doing in the Gulf of Mexico. It was this lack of knowledge that led the Center for Biological Diversity to file a lawsuit against the government to compel them to release that info.

treehugger.com

by Mat McDermott

June 4, 2015

It's no secret that tortoises are among the most resilient animals on Earth, perfectly adapted for life in natural environments that others would find inhospitable.

But for one particularly tenacious pet tortoise, that hardy sense of survival allowed it to endure for decades in the most unnatural of places. Back in 1982, the Almeida Family was saddened to learn that their beloved pet, Manuela, a young red-footed tortoise, had gone missing.

tehachapinews.com

by Darla A. Baker

June 4, 2015

Carl Hutto, 17, got up early that Sunday morning in hopes of getting his chores done so he could go to the pool with his brother later in the day.

Little did he know that something would stand in the way of his completing his tasks the morning of May 31, and that something stood about three feet tall and had sharp teeth and claws.

foodsafetynews.com

by Cookson Beecher

June 1, 2015

An infectious brain disease that has been killing deer, elk and moose both in the wild and on "captive farms" continues to stalk the land, expanding its domain to 23 states and two Canadian provinces since it was first identified in captive mule deer.

Known as chronic wasting disease, or CWD, it has baffled scientists for decades. Where did it come from, and why is it spreading across the landscape? What health risks might it pose to humans who eat parts of infected animals? And can cattle get it from infected deer, elk, and moose, thus introducing it into the human food chain?

ksbw.com

by Caitlin Conrad

May 29, 2015

Scientists with the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary are predicting a mass die-off on the Central Coast because of a powerful red tide.

Researchers are seeing the highest levels of red tide in more than a decade, and they're worried it will have grave impacts on marine life. "This is probably the largest domoic acid event they've seen in the last decade, so it is pretty severe," said Scott Kathey of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary.

siskiyoudaily.com

by David Smith

May 28, 2015

A bill in the California Senate may give a wider stretch of time to cast a line for those who do not purchase their licenses at the start of the year.

The current price of $41.07 is price-adjusted from the 2004 base fee of $31.25. SB 345 would increase the base fee to $42.50, increasing the cost of a 12-month license in some areas, but reducing it in others.

slate.com

by Eric Holthaus

May 14, 2015

Last year at this time, I was harping about the "monster" El Niño that seemed to be brewing in the tropical Pacific Ocean. It didn't pan out. But from the looks of the latest data, I was just one year too early.

irst off, it's rapidly intensifying. El Niño is about self-reinforcing feedbacks between the ocean and the atmosphere, and from all accounts, this one has its foot on the accelerator pedal. If it continues, the impacts will be felt around the globe-here's my detailed rundown of what to expect. Among them: drought in Australia, Southeast Asia, and perhaps India, with flooding in Peru and Southern California.

sandiegoreader.com

by Ken Harrison

May 13, 2015

Many San Diego anglers are rejoicing that California appears to finally be moving towards a 12-month from-date-purchase fishing license. Senate Bill 187, written by Sen. Tom Berryhill (R-Twain Harte) unanimously passed.

For years, anglers have complained the Department of Fish and Wildlife licenses are a state rip-off. No mater when purchased, the annual fishing license expires on December 31. Most anglers wait until the spring or summer fishing season to renew their licenses.

      
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