Reliable Answers - News and Commentary

Nature in the News

Channel Island Fox at the Coyote Point Museum, San Mateo, CA

Channel Island Fox

Nature in the News contains interesting, entertaining and educational articles about wildlife, nature and ecology issues. This news page contains information on everything from Yosemite rock slides and mountain lion legislation, to global warming, climate change and tiny little hummingbirds.

If you aren't sure where you stand on the issues, don't feel alone. The world we live in becomes more complex every single day. Is the earth as fragile as some would have us believe or has it endured because it's quite resilient? You decide. These issues are not going away and will continue to plague us with complex problems that will require us all to make hard decisions.

You will find plenty of food for thought and information to contemplate. Be sure to check back often.

      
 Title   Date   Author   Host 

fox5sandiego.com

by Maria Arcega-Dunn

April 27, 2016

CORONADO, Calif. - Various sea creatures have been washing ashore on San Diego beaches in recent months and now seahorses have been added to the list.

Coronado residents have found a few seahorses on the coastline and scientists say it's likely because of El Niño. Other seahorses have been found within the last month from Orange County and Coronado to Imperial Beach. The reason it's unusual is this particular species known as the Pacific Seahorse is normally found hanging out in the waters off central Baja all the way down to Peru.

thepinetree.net

April 24, 2016

Now in its 48th year, the Bear Valley Music Festival begins on Friday, July 22 and runs through Sunday, August 7 with a total 15 concerts including a special free family matinee on Saturday, July 30.

The festival showcases a wide selection of artists and genres including rock, classical, bluegrass and jazz. A mere 3.5-hour drive from San Francisco, Bear Valley is known primarily as a ski resort.

theeventchronicle.com

by Michael Snyder

April 17, 2016

Why is the crust of the Earth shaking so violently all of a sudden? Over the past 48 hours, there have been five major earthquakes globally, and one prominent seismologist has declared that "catastrophic mega earthquakes" could be on the way.

In fact, seismologist Roger Bilham of the University of Colorado has made headlines all over the world by warning that "current conditions might trigger at least four earthquakes greater than 8.0 in magnitude". If his projections are accurate, our planet could be on the precipice of a wave of natural disasters unlike anything that any of us have ever experienced before.

huffingtonpost.com

by Nina Golgowski

April 12, 2016

A monster alligator, said to weigh 800 pounds, was recently hauled out of Florida's marshes after being blamed for snacking on a landowner's cattle, and now this ravenous reptile, given to charity, will be a meal for some hungry humans.

The huge beast was pulled Saturday from a pond at private hunting grounds near Okeechobee. Its head appeared to be the size of a small boy. Blake Godwin, a hunting guide for Outwest Farms, which offers wild boar, alligator and turkey hunts, said they found the gator with the remains of some of their missing livestock.

newint.org

by Wayne Ellwood

April 12, 2016

From the air, the earth is shorn and desiccated. Waves of heat billow upward, mixed with plumes of smoke. A few lonely trees stand in relief against the flattened landscape, while knots of cattle clump together in dusty paddocks ringed by barbed wire.

Fifty years ago, Rondônia was swathed in dense tropical rainforest. Today, it is one of the most deforested parts of the Brazilian Amazon. An astonishing 100,000 square kilometres of forest has vanished from the state since 1978. Poor people from the crowded coastal areas, attracted by land and opportunity, flocked here in the 1970s when roads began to penetrate the forest. First came loggers, who harvested the valuable tropical hardwoods; then settlers, who cleared the remaining trees to plant maize and soy; and finally large landowners, who consolidated the land to graze cattle. Two-thirds of Brazil's deforested land is used for cattle ranching.

uniondemocrat.com

by Guy McCarthy

April 11, 2016

For the first time in recent memory and perhaps the first time ever, entrance fees will be waived at Yosemite National Park for nine days, April 16 to April 24, to celebrate 100 years of the National Park Service.

Typical entrance fees at Yosemite are $15 per person on foot, bicycle, horse, or non-commercial bus or van with more than 15 passenger seats, $20 per motorcycle, and $30 per non-commercial car, pickup truck, RV or van with 15 or fewer passenger seats.

standard.co.uk

by Joshi Herrmann

April 10, 2016

Giant mirrors in space, boats that create artificial clouds and special air balloons being readied for the next time a major volcano erupts - geoengineering is an area of science with so many fantastical possibilities.

It is also one of science's most contested terrains. Broadly defined as the deliberate large-scale manipulation of the environment and also known as "climate intervention", geoengineering is a field that potentially promises a dramatic Plan B for Earth's impending climate catastrophe, but some say it could lead to war and famine for millions.

realfarmacy.com

by Michele Miller

April 3, 2016

Palm oil is used in many things from chips and baked goods to shampoo and cleaning products to an oil used for cooking. It is the most widley used vegetable oil in the world.

It even sounds healthier because it's different from GMO vegetable oil like canola. It comes from a palm fruit grown on an African oil palm tree so what could be unhealthy, harmful, or unsustainable about that? Well it's contributing to the death of thousands of orangutans and many other animals who live in the forests. Not to mention, it's affecting the indigenous people and the environment.

bbc.com

by David Shukman

April 3, 2016

Schemes to tackle climate change could prove disastrous for billions of people, but might be required for the good of the planet, scientists say. That is the conclusion of a new set of studies into what's become known as geo-engineering.

This is the so far unproven science of intervening in the climate to bring down temperatures. These projects work by, for example, shading the Earth from the Sun or soaking up carbon dioxide. Ideas include aircraft spraying out sulphur particles at high altitude to mimic the cooling effect of volcanoes or using artificial "trees" to absorb CO2.

wsj.com

by Jacob Bunge

March 31, 2016

Environmental groups filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Thursday, challenging the agency's authority to approve genetically modified animals used for food.

      
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