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How To Master CSS

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 Title   Date   Author   Host 

aclu.org

by Alex Abdo

August 2, 2013

In the wake of recent news that the NSA is spying on Americans, I have been particularly struck by the argument that "if you've got nothing to hide, you've got nothing to fear."

At first blush, this argument might seem sound - after all, if the government is merely conducting anti-terrorism surveillance, non-terrorists shouldn't be affected, right? But if you look more closely, you'll see this idea is full of holes. The "nothing to hide" argument mistakenly suggests that privacy is something only criminals desire. In fact, we choose to do many things in private - sing in the shower, make love, confide in family and friends - even though they are not wrong or illegal. Who would not be embarrassed if all of their most intimate details were exposed?

activistpost.com

by Dave Hodges

July 21, 2013

Every day a granny is goosed by TSA, a federal SWAT team raids the wrong house, a citizen acquitted of a crime still has their property confiscated by authorities, even the dumbed down public is aware that their every communication is monitored by the NSA and Obama has set his administration up to violate every constitutional right of every citizen in America under the NDAA and Executive Order 13603. Anyone who possess an IQ above room temperature is aware that our federal government is totally out of control and is wreaking tyranny upon the American people. As a people, we have seemingly grown numb to the constitutional violations perpetrated by our government against the citizens of this country. However, the abuse of citizens does not begin and end with the federal government.

adsense.blogspot.com

by The Ad Traffic Quality Team

November 30, 2011

During the AdSense team's recent policy webinars, a number of publishers posted questions on our Google Moderator page about invalid click activity and the resources available to help them protect their accounts.

We've brought in experts from the Ad Traffic Quality team to address your top questions about invalid clicks here in this post today. As a quick introduction, our responsibility on the Ad Traffic Quality team is to monitor traffic across Google's ad network and prevent advertisers from paying for invalid traffic. We've recently launched an in-depth Ad Traffic Quality Resource Center, a site designed for both advertisers and publishers to learn more about invalid clicks. This site also aggregates various resources that help you learn about invalid clicks and maintain a successful AdWords or AdSense account.

adwords.blogspot.com

by David W. Baker

January 17, 2013

While most people are working on productive New Year's resolutions, scammers and bad actors will begin 2013 with the same old goal: make money with the help of bad ads.

Advertising helps fund businesses online and enables them to provide services and content for free to their users. But, bad ads can ruin your web experience, putting you and legitimate businesses in harm's way. We have a vested interest in fighting bad ads and their sources with considerable firepower. Luckily, our ads quality team hasn't changed its New Year's resolutions either: stop bad ads and eliminate bad actors from our systems. In 2012, we continued to make progress towards this goal: we introduced new tools for stopping bad ads, provided greater transparency around the ads review process, and explained how advertisers can connect with us if we ever mistakenly disapprove good ads. Below is a more complete look at our efforts to combat bad ads in 2012.

andrewnapolitano.com

August 8, 2014

In some respects, the recent admission by CIA Director John Brennan that his agents and his lawyers have been spying on the senators whose job it is to monitor the agency should come as no surprise.

The agency's job is to steal and keep secrets, and implicit in those tasks, Brennan would no doubt argue, is lying. Yet in another respect, this may very well be a smoking gun in the now substantial case against President Barack Obama that alleges that much of his official behavior has manifested lawlessness and incompetence. It is hard to believe that the president did not know about this but not hard to believe he would look the other way.

andrewnapolitano.com

August 9, 2013

The heads of the nation's three top intelligence agencies said Thursday they strive to protect Americans' privacy in an evolving era of cybersecurity threats, electronic surveillance and concerns about government data-monitoring.

Since former government contract systems analyst Edward Snowden leaked classified documents about the National Security Agency's data-gathering in May, lawmakers and average Americans have re-engaged in debate over the boundaries between preventing terrorism and preserving Americans' privacy rights. Speaking at a cybersecurity conference, CIA Director John Brennan, FBI Director Robert Mueller and the NSA director, Gen. Keith Alexander, didn't directly address the agency's programs that sweep up swaths of data on phone and Internet use, including hundreds of millions of Americans' phone records. The officials spoke largely about malicious software attacks and other electronic intrusions.

andrewnapolitano.com

May 16, 2013

Attorney General Eric Holder has flatly rejected the idea of appointing special counsel to investigate the Benghazi situation.

Between Benghazi, the seizure of AP phone records, and the IRS scandal, can we really trust government officials to handle these situations on their own? Judge Napolitano said pointedly, "The common thread here is that the government can't be trusted, but the government thinks that we will trust them. The government will break whatever law it wants in order to meet its own political ends."

Arstechnica

by Josh Meier

July 25, 2005

I remember the days when hackers kept security exploits to themselves in order to gain hacker points among their fellow hackers. These days they just sell them to companies like TippingPoint. .. or do they?

TippingPoint, part of 3Com, produces intrusion prevention systems for computer systems and, in order to get a leg up on the competition, they have started offering money in exchange for the disclosure of new security vulnerabilities. The idea is that they will be able to get a leg up on competing security products if they are able to patch a vulnerability before their competitors even know it exists. TippingPoint can then use the vulnerability information to update their own security software, while notifying the original software developer of the problem.

arstechnica.com

by David Kravets

July 14, 2014

US says global reach needed to gut "fraudsters," "hackers," and "drug dealers."

Global governments, the tech sector, and scholars are closely following a legal flap in which the US Justice Department claims that Microsoft must hand over e-mail stored in Dublin, Ireland. In essence, President Barack Obama's administration claims that any company with operations in the United States must comply with valid warrants for data, even if the content is stored overseas. It's a position Microsoft and companies like Apple say is wrong, arguing that the enforcement of US law stops at the border.

arstechnica.com

by Dan Goodin

April 14, 2014

Over six hours, tax IDs plucked from servers run by the Canada Revenue agency.

Underscoring the severity of the Heartbleed bug affecting huge swaths of the Internet, hackers exploited the vulnerability to steal taxpayer data for at least 900 Canadian citizens and an unknown number of businesses, officials in that country warned Monday morning. Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) officials said they removed public access to online tax services last Tuesday, a day after the catastrophic defect in the widely used OpenSSL cryptography library surfaced. But by then it was too late. Hackers casing online CRA services were nonetheless able to exploit the OpenSSL flaw, which makes it possible to pluck private encryption keys, passwords, and other sundry sensitive data out of the private computer memory of servers running vulnerable versions of the open-source library.

      

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