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 Title   Date   Author   Host 

RT

July 1, 2014

Previously undisclosed files leaked to the media by former intelligence contractor Edward Snowden now show that the United States National Security Agency has been authorized to spy on persons in all but four countries.

The Washington Post published on Monday official documents provided by Mr. Snowden that shows new proof concerning the extent of the NSA's vast surveillance apparatus. One of the documents-a file marked "top secret" from 2010 and approved by the US Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court-shows that the NSA has been authorized to conduct surveillance on 193 foreign government, as well as various factions and organizations around the world, including the International Monetary Fund, the European Union and the International Atomic Energy Agency. "Virtually no foreign government is off-limits for the National Security Agency, which has been authorized to intercept information from individuals 'concerning' all but four countries on Earth, according to top-secret documents," journalists Ellen Nakashima and Barton Gellman wrote for the Post.

reason.com

June 30, 2014

The surprising thing about the Supreme Court's decision on police searches of cell phones was its unanimity.

The surprising thing about the Supreme Court's decision on police searches of cell phones was its unanimity. Aligned on the same side of a major law enforcement issue were liberal and conservative justices who normally fight like cats and dogs. All agreed that it's intolerable to let cops ransack the voluminous contents of mobile phones. Who could disagree? Well, cops, of course. And the Obama administration.

countercurrentnews.com

June 29, 2014

Today Germany broke the news to the world that they will cancel a national contract with Verizon Communications.

This comes as part of the continued fallout from revelations by Edward J. Snowden, the former National Security Agency contractor, who leaked the truth that American intelligence agencies have been routine accessing global data provided by telecom companies. One of the most upset amongst nations has been Germany, where the personal cellphone of Chancellor Angela Merkel was reportedly tapped by United States intelligence agencies.

businessinsider.com

June 17, 2014

A hacker figured out how to control the certain home networks to mine for something called Dogecoin, netting over half a million dollars.

In this case, a hacker figured out how to control certain home networks to mine for a computer currency called Dogecoin, netting over half a million dollars in a matter of months. The hacker's exploits were documented by Dell's security team, which points out that the hacker used a competitor's computer storage product to do the dirty work. The Dell team traced the likely culprit to a German-speaking person who goes by the code-name of "Folio" on GitHub.

RT

June 12, 2014

A gaping security bug in Google's systems may have been used to unearth millions upon millions of users' email addresses. The activist claimed it took Google a month to rectify the problem after his report to the company.

Tel Aviv-based security researcher Oren Hafif discovered the bug and has informed Google, which has managed to resolve the problem. However, before Hafif notified Google, he successfully retrieved some 37,000 addresses from the system. "I have every reason to believe every Gmail address could have been mined," Hafif told Wired.

thefreethoughtproject.com

June 11, 2014

New cyberbullying legislation introduced by the Canadian government is set to let police gain access to computers and remotely track cellphone users' movements and activities, privacy experts fear.

Bill C-13 Protecting Canadians from Online Crime Act, known as the cyberbullying bill, is currently being studied by a parliamentary committee. In fact, the term 'cyberbullying' may be a bit misleading: there are no mentions of 'cyber' or 'bully' in the document, despite the fact that the bill originated following several children committing suicide as a result of online bullying. Despite the bill introducing responsibility for sending nude photos, for instance, what the law mainly does is greatly expand police authority, giving officers powers to remotely hack into computers, mobile devices or cars in order to track location or record metadata, director of the Canadian Civil Liberties Association Cara Zwibel told Members of Parliament. She added that those changes were "inappropriate."

RT

June 7, 2014

Edward Snowden's recent revelation that the NSA can bug cell phones even when they are turned off left some experts split on whether it is true or not. But a group of hackers claim that at least there is a way to protect your phone from spies' ears.

Snowden, who exposed the American government's secret mass surveillance program, has been making headlines in the media for almost a year with shocking details about the scale of snooping by the National Security Agency (NSA). In last week's interview with NBC, the former CIA employee yet again added to the spreading privacy panic when he said the NSA can actually eavesdrop on cellphones even when they are turned off.

RT

June 7, 2014

Leaked documents pertaining to the case against an American computer hacker currently serving a 10-year prison sentence have exposed discrepancies concerning the government's prosecution and raise further questions about the role of a federal informant.

The documents - evidence currently under seal by order of a United States District Court judge and not made public until now - shines light on several aspects of the case against Jeremy Hammond, a 29-year-old hacktivist from Chicago, Illinois who was arrested in March 2012 with the help of an online acquaintance-turned-government informant. Last May, Hammond entered a plea deal in which he acknowledged his role in a number of cyberattacks waged by the hacktivist group Anonymous and various offshoots; had his case gone to trial, Hammond would have faced a maximum of life behind bars if found guilty by jury. Articles published in tandem by The Daily Dot and Motherboard on Thursday this week pull back the curtain on the government's investigation into Hammond and reveal the role that Hector Monsegur, a hacker who agreed to cooperate with authorities in exchange for leniency with regards to his own criminal matters, played in directing others towards vulnerable targets and orchestrating cyberattacks against the websites of foreign governments, all while under the constant watch of the US government.

thefreethoughtproject.com

June 1, 2014

The National Security Agency is collecting millions of images of people through its international surveillance network to be implemented in a number of other facial recognition programs, according to documents leaked by Edward Snowden.

Thanks to rapid advances being made in the field of facial recognition technology, the NSA is much better equipped to "exploit the flood of images included in emails, text messages, social media, video conferences and other communications," according to an article in the New York Times, co-written by Laura Poitras, who, together with Glen Greenwald, are the only two journalists to have received the leaked NSA documents. The NSA has the capacity to intercept "millions of images per day," as well as some 55,000 "facial recognition quality images." This latest milestone in US intelligence gathering, which goes a long way to putting the final touches on the much-feared Orwellian nightmare, gives the US spy agency "tremendous untapped potential," according to the 2011 documents.

thefreethoughtproject.com

May 12, 2014

The rapid emergence of smart phones with high definition cameras leads to consequences for law-breaking cops.

Recently, law enforcement throughout the country has been trying to pass laws that would make it illegal to film them while they're on duty. But Apple is coming out with a new technology that would put all the power in a cop's hands.

      

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