Reliable Answers - News and Commentary

Virus Information News

How To Master CSS

How To Master CSS

"With How To Master CSS, you'll discover how to read stylesheets, how to recognise the best solution and how to translate a graphical design to a real website, simply by watching my fun and sophisticated training videos. Hundreds of people, just like you, worldwide have used my unique multimedia course to fast-track their Stylesheet learning, while having piles of fun in the process. Will you be next?"

It doesn't matter what level you are at now (beginner or intermediate), How to Master CSS is packed full of quality step-by-step lessons, video files, an editor and other resources to get YOU results fast!

      
 Title   Date   Author   Host 

thefreethoughtproject.com

May 12, 2014

The rapid emergence of smart phones with high definition cameras leads to consequences for law-breaking cops.

Recently, law enforcement throughout the country has been trying to pass laws that would make it illegal to film them while they're on duty. But Apple is coming out with a new technology that would put all the power in a cop's hands.

hosted.ap.org

by Don Thompson

May 8, 2014

On a second attempt, California lawmakers advanced a bill Thursday that would require electronics manufacturers to install a shut-off function in all smartphones as a way to deter what one senator called a crime wave of thefts.

The legislation by Democratic Sen. Mark Leno requires companies to produce smartphones with technology that makes them inoperable if the owner loses possession. It fell two votes short of passing the 40-member Senate two weeks ago, but Leno said amendments since then removed opposition from Apple Inc. and Microsoft Corp. It now applies to smartphones manufactured and sold after July 2015 and no longer includes tablets. The wireless industry, however, opposes the measure as unnecessary.

blog.bitly.com

by Ultralinx

May 8, 2014

We have reason to believe that Bitly account credentials have been compromised; specifically, users' email addresses, encrypted passwords, API keys and OAuth tokens.

We have no indication at this time that any accounts have been accessed without permission. We have taken steps to ensure the security of all accounts, including disconnecting all users' Facebook and Twitter accounts. All users can safely reconnect these accounts at their next login. We are recommending all Bitly users make these changes. Please take the following steps to secure your account: change your API key and OAuth token, reset your password, and reconnect your Facebook and Twitter accounts.

eff.org

May 6, 2014

Yesterday afternoon, Ars Technica published a story reporting two possible logs of Heartbleed attacks occurring in the wild, months before Monday's public disclosure of the vulnerability.

It would be very bad news if these stories were true, indicating that blackhats and/or intelligence agencies may have had a long period when they knew about the attack and could use it at their leisure. In response to the story, EFF called for further evidence of Heartbleed attacks in the wild prior to Monday. The first thing we learned was that the SeaCat report was a possible false positive; the pattern in their logs looks like it could be caused by ErrataSec's masscan software, and indeed one of the source IPs was ErrataSec.

schneier.com

May 5, 2014

Heartbleed is a catastrophic bug in OpenSSL. Basically, an attacker can grab 64K of memory from a server. The attack leaves no trace, and can be done multiple times to grab a different random 64K of memory.

"Catastrophic" is the right word. On the scale of 1 to 10, this is an 11. Half a million sites are vulnerable, including my own. Test your vulnerability here. The bug has been patched. After you patch your systems, you have to get a new public/private key pair, update your SSL certificate, and then change every password that could potentially be affected. At this point, the probability is close to one that every target has had its private keys extracted by multiple intelligence agencies. The real question is whether or not someone deliberately inserted this bug into OpenSSL, and has had two years of unfettered access to everything. My guess is accident, but I have no proof.

betanews.com

by Ian Barker

May 1, 2014

The average private user PC in the UK has 76 different programs from 26 different vendors, which leaves users struggling to keep everything up to date.

Vulnerability management specialist Secunia has published a report on the state of security among PC users in the UK based on scans from Secunia Personal Software Inspector between January and March 2014. It finds that 58 percent of identified vulnerabilities originate from third party programs, 29 percent from Microsoft programs and 13 percent from operating systems. More worrying is that 12 percent of users are using unpatched operating systems, a figure that's likely to rise following the end of support for XP. Just over one in ten third-party programs on the average PC are unpatched compared to just over three percent of Microsoft programs.

Personal Liberty Alerts

by Sam Rolley

April 25, 2014

A series of top-secret court documents reveal the extent to which private companies have been powerless to protect customers against NSA spying.

The documents from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court reveal that a phone company whose name was redacted in the documents challenged an NSA's request to hand over telecommunications data in bulk. The company petitioned the court to "vacate, modify or affirm the current production order" in January after a District Judge ruled that the NSA's phone records program was likely unConstitutional a month earlier. "Judge [Richard] Leon's Memorandum Opinion introduces, for the first time, a question about the legal validity of an order issued by this Court," the company stated.

techtimes.com

by Joseph Mayton

April 21, 2014

Reports suggested that the National Security Agency (NSA) may have been exploiting the Heartbleed Bug in order to grab personal information of millions of Americans.

Now, reports are surfacing that Google may have known about the online bug before it was made public, putting into question the Mountain View-based search company's intentions into question. In a series of reports, including one from Fairfax Media, Google has been accused of learning about the bug, but failing to report it to Open Source and company rivals, which many tech experts believe to be evidence that Google was exploiting the OpenSSL bug for its own purposes.

o.canada.com

by Douglas Quan and Vito Pilieci

April 18, 2014

A Western University computer-science student has been accused by authorities of exploiting the online security vulnerability known as Heartbleed that led to a breach of personal data from the Canada Revenue Agency website.

The fact that it didn't take long for authorities to zero in on a suspect - the arrest comes roughly a week after the data theft was spotted - suggests the security breach may not have been committed by an elite hacker as many in the security community had feared, experts said Wednesday. "You know in the movie scenes when they are tracing a call and they show you the global map and the guy making the call is bouncing off of a bunch of global satellites? That's what a good attacker would do and a professional would do. They would bounce their attack off of a bunch of proxy servers; it'd never be easily traced back to them," said Mark Nunnikhoven, vice-president of cloud and emerging technology at security research firm Trend Micro.

tech.mit.edu

by Nicole Perlroth

April 18, 2014

Ever since the Heartbleed bug was exposed last week, the question everyone has been asking is: Did anyone exploit it before a Google researcher first discovered it?

The worry is that in the two years since the bug was accidentally incorporated into OpenSSL - a crucial piece of free security software used by governments and companies like the FBI and Google - attackers could have exploited Heartbleed to take sensitive information like passwords and the virtual keys used to decipher any scrambled information stored on a web server. What's more, they could have done so without leaving evidence detectable by the normal methods used to track who has gained access to a server.

      

Help keep this page up-to-date. Submit a Virus Information News link for inclusion on this page.

[Kidjacked] - learn and discuss Social-Political events and Family issues

Take me to the top

Your Ad Here?

Contact our Marketing department for information about advertising on this domain.


Take me to the top

We invite you
to visit:

Professional Web Hosting and Design Services: 12 Point Design Local Homeschool provides the most up-to-date support group listings in a geographical and searchable index Budget Homeschool Kidjacked -- To seize control of a child, by use of force SaferPC dispels security misunderstandings and provides you with a solid understanding of viruses and computer security Reliable Answers - developer information, current news, human interest and legislative news Twain Harte Photo Gallery - Twain Harte, CA - The closest you can get to Heaven on Earth Cranial Laser & Neurolymphatic Release Techniques (CLNRT) - Experience dramatic pain reduction At Summit Chiropractic our mission is to improve your quality of life - We know that health is much more than just not feeling pain Visit UniveralPreschool.com to learn about your preschool options. Dave's Quick Search Deskbar
Reliable Answers.com/virus/news.asp AddThis Social Bookmark Button
Google